Prototyping a Coding Class for All



Type: News

We believe that all learners should be exposed to programming regardless of their professional aspirations. Programming develops skills in critical thinking, problem solving, and structured planning through the experience of creating something. In addition to cultivating these important life skills, programming assists in demystifying technology, allowing the learner to make sense of how electronics work in the world around them. As we move into an era of enchanted objectswearable technology, and the Internet of Things, we believe learning programming is vital.

Creative Coding
This semester marks the start of ASB offering Creative Coding in the High School for students in grades 9 to 12. Students will learn the core concepts of programming through personalized projects, explore different methods of interacting with computer programs (Xbox Kinect, mobile phones, etc), and produce creative solutions of their own. In addition, learners will apply the concepts they’ve learned in math, physics, and other subjects within their programs. The goal of the Creative Coding class is to empower every student with the essential skills that coding develops.One of the most important decisions that we agreed for Creative Coding was to use the Processing programming language. The Processing website describes its language as:“…a flexible software sketchbook and a language for learning how to code within the context of the visual arts. Since 2001, Processing has promoted software literacy within the visual arts and visual literacy within technology. There are tens of thousands of students, artists, designers, researchers, and hobbyists who use Processing for learning and prototyping.” (Processing.org)

The power Processing offers over other languages is its’ ability to make programming available and engaging to learners that may not have ever tried programming. The code written in Processing creates a visual output that makes it easy for a learner to see what their code is doing. A drawing program can be made in less than 10 lines of code, something that would require a couple hundred lines of code in a language like C++ or Java.

This allows learners to engage in creating programs that are meaningful without have to include libraries, produce extra code, or any of the other hurdles that exist in traditional programming languages. It just works! Processing code looks very similar to and uses the same concepts as the popular computer science languages, making it easy to transition if the learner decides to study a computer science or related field.

We look forward to showing you some of the projects that come from the Creative Coding class in future blog posts.